Of Pomegranates and Monasteries: A Trip to Armenia

Expat Life, Wanderings

*This has been sitting in my drafts for over a year. Never had the time to transfer and process the photos. Excuses, I know. ;-p

My best friend and life partner recently came back from a trip to Armenia where pomegranates are abundant, wine is cheap and ancient monasteries are a common sight.

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Sevanakvank Monastery at Lake Sevan.

This country in the Caucasus region is famous for the magnificent views of Mt. Ararat which is actually located in the eastern part of Turkey that borders with Iran, Armenia and Azerbaijan. It is believed to be the mountains where Noah’s Ark rested after the great flood.

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Note: This is not Mt. Ararat but is just as beautiful.

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Armenia became the first Christian country in the world in 301 AD and this is evidenced by the numerous churches and monasteries scattered around the country.

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St. Grigor Lusavorich Cathedral

Getting there from Dubai isn’t difficult as you can easily book an affordable return trip online via flydubai or Air Arabia. As for a place to stay while exploring Armenia’s attractions, there are a variety of hotels and hostels depending on your preference. Mathew booked a bed on a dorm-type room in a clean and accessible hostel for a decent price which also included breakfast. Day tours can be pre-arranged but you can also book once you’re already there.

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The Cascade. A famous Landmark in Yerevan which houses the Cafesjian Center for the Arts thus the art pieces in and around the giant staircase structure.

If you have a Philippine passport you are entitled to a visa on arrival for USD 6 for a 21-day Single-Entry visa. You may check Armenia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs website for visa guidelines and updated visa fees.

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The Temple of Garni

I can’t say much of how the whole trip was because I wasn’t personally there but basing on his enthusiasm while reliving his experience, he surely was delighted. The big bonus for him was seeing and feeling authentic snow.

Here are the rest of his photos. 🙂

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Quaint restaurants near Republic Square

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Soviet-era cars are still present in the streets of Armenia giving off a truly vintage vibe.

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A tourist lighting a candle inside the Geghard Monastery.

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History Museum of Armenia

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Snoooow. Ticked off the list. 😀

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I felt like I was touring Armenia while scanning all the photos. But of course, nothing beats the actual experience. Here’s to hoping and wishing we could go together next time! 🙂 ❤

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2 thoughts on “Of Pomegranates and Monasteries: A Trip to Armenia

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